This topic contains 10 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  Domino Marama 4 days, 11 hours ago.

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  • #96360 Score: 0

    Domino Marama
    Participant
    4 pts

    So far I’ve been using approx A5 paper for my paintings. This is partly to keep cost down while I’m learning the basics but also because I imagine working smaller makes brush and water control far more difficult, forcing me to get better quicker.

    I’d be interested to hear peoples thoughts and experience on working on different sized paper and whether it does makes a difference in things like how wet you can work, needing more control etc.

  • #96383 Score: 0

    Patricia L
    Participant
    6 pts

    Interesting topic Domino. I usually work in my sketchbook which is 5 1/2 by 8″ or my handmade sketchbook which is 6×9″ and made with Fabriano Artistico 100% cotton. Today, for the first time, I tried to paint something from my sketchbook on 9×12 watercolour paper.

    I’m finding that the larger the paper, the harder the washes are to control and I also find I’m wanting to do more wet in wet when using larger paper.

    I think the size of the paper is one consideration, but we adjust don’t we. I think the quality and whether or not the paper is Cold Press, Hot Press or Rough may make a bigger difference.

    I’m pretty much a rank beginner, so this is just my opinion taken from my limited experience so far.

  • #96386 Score: 0

    Lora
    Participant
    2 pts

    Like Patricia, I’m a beginner. I always paint 5 x 7 inches and half that size for less “serious” paintings. Anything bigger is scary to me at the moment; not sure if it’s the big scary white space or worried about wasting paper, not sure exact reason, but it involves fear, I do know that. LOL

    • #96491 Score: 0

      Domino Marama
      Participant
      4 pts

      When I was deciding what medium to go for, I watched some tutorials from Stefan Baumann who has a great series of videos on doodling. In the first one he has a great lesson on getting over the fear of blank sketchbooks, which basically amounts to abusing them until they don’t feel so precious 🙂

  • #96408 Score: 0

    Brad
    Participant
    18 pts

    Don’t be afraid of waste. In lots of ways larger is easier I think

    Take time to look and make sure you see.

  • #96415 Score: 0

    brynteg
    Participant
    1 pt

    I agree with Brad, once you get over the fear of messing it up, it is easier and much more liberating to get your big brushes out and get some water and colour on a big piece of paper like A3 size once in a while. I do use both sides of the paper whenever possible and so keep costs down a bit.

     

  • #96423 Score: 0

    Domino Marama
    Participant
    4 pts

    I think the size of the paper is one consideration, but we adjust don’t we. I think the quality and whether or not the paper is Cold Press, Hot Press or Rough may make a bigger difference.

    I’m sure paper type and quality does play a big role too. I went from craft card to a pretty high quality paper before I’d done a half dozen paintings and it really exaggerated the difference paper can make.

    I didn’t have any watercolour paper for my first few attempts at painting. I used linen card from a pound shop. I’m guessing it’s unsized as it’s very absorbent and paint drys really quickly on it. I adjusted to that by saturating the card with water, which let me work wet in wet (as long as I used a light touch and no scrubbing).

    I’ve since bought a load of 2nd hand art supplies (and paintings) at a local auction. The paper I’m using now was a few loose sheets that I cut up, but I think it’s Bockingford 300gsm NOT – I’ve a couple of packets of that and a roll of mystery paper to use once I’ve finished the loose sheets. So cost isn’t an issue with going larger now for awhile..

    • #96425 Score: 1

      Domino Marama
      Participant
      4 pts

      Thanks everyone for posting your thoughts. It’s good to hear my imaginings that working bigger is easier are generally right, and that working wetter is a part of that. I thought that would give an extended working time and lead to more confident brush strokes (more time to watch effect & correct with bigger distance to spread), but it’s really hard to tell from just watching videos if that was actually the case.

      While we are talking about paper, I’ve ordered some magic water paper (chinese calligraphy practice paper) to practice brush strokes on. It turns black when wet and returns to white when dry (5 minutes), and seems an ideal way to have cram sessions on brush work. Anyone else tried this?

    • #96430 Score: 1

      Domino Marama
      Participant
      4 pts

      Here’s Domino#1 (my very first painting!) which was done on the linen craft card with Koh-i-noor Hardtmuth (a dye based watercolour) and some cheap water brushes. I did a few paintings with that setup before upgrading my paper and getting a set of 24 Cotman and some normal brushes.

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    • #96490 Score: 0

      PeteS
      Participant
      1 pt

      Great painting Domino… especially being your first and on craft paper – well done. You can paint on anything… but it is actually a lot harder when the material is fighting against you, so well done for getting the results you did. You will find good watercolour paper a lot easier – Easier to get smooth washes, easier to control edges and more vibrancy as the paint is not getting lost soaking away into the paper. Keep it up!

  • #96489 Score: 0

    PeteS
    Participant
    1 pt

    I generally work on 1/8 sheet size which just about suites me. I do find working on larger paper more intimidating but it does allow you more room to carry on working around the page on different bits without waiting for stuff to dry constantly – you just move on to a dry bit. In my sketchbook I have to be more careful not to stick my big mitts on something I just painted, or get impatient and end up with colour bleeding where I don’t want it.

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