This topic contains 10 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  DavidG14 2 weeks, 1 day ago.

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  • #97312 Score: 1

    AlexK
    Participant
    6 pts

    I’ve painted numerous sketches of this place and not a single one worth saving really. I have a hard time painting cracks on the wall. It always turns out harsh and noisy. ( no wonder I keep repiting same mistakes )

    ideally i dont want to paint any details on the right wall but could not come up with a solution. Harsh critic is welcome. Thanks for looking.

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  • #97315 Score: 0

    AlexK
    Participant
    6 pts

    Here is foto of this place. I have painted my son out of it.

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  • #97317 Score: 0

    Paula
    Participant
    11 pts

    I like both your paintings! But if you’re not satisfied, you might want to take a look at the paintings and you tube videos of Roland Lee, who does gorgeous watercolors of scenes in the American Southwest, particularly Zion National Park and other places in Utah.

    Paula

    • #97327 Score: 0

      AlexK
      Participant
      6 pts

      Thanks Paula for your advice. I was trying to paint Ronald Lee’s sky in second painting but it wasn’t wet enough and was just too colorful spots. So not even thinking much I “fixed “it with some gray mix over. Then blue part of the sky looked pale I went and strengthened that and at that point I lost it. But sketch is a sketch. I think I’ve learned something useful there. As much as I like Ronald’s paintings I don’t have desire to paint as tidy as he does. I always liked loose style. That’s the only reason I followed Patrick’s videos and eventually his web site.

  • #97319 Score: 0

    Joy Dix
    Participant
    2 pts

    Your not a million miles away, Alex.   I like the first one best.  It just needs a little tweaking.    The rocks and scree slope on the left (as viewed) are very much in shadow and yet are also close enough for some detail.   Paint your detail in and then paint good deep shadow over it to bring it forward.    The rocks in the background viewed through the gap need to be a paler colour than the rocks on the right (as viewed) but still rock coloured, albeit with a hint of blue to push it into the background and not just flat colour.   At the moment it reads more like sea viewed between rocks.

    You could also put some more detail in the foreground.small rocks and stones to catch the eye and cast shadow for interest.

    It’s the depth that makes the view so framatic and if you can manage to capture that by emphasizing the depth of colour in the different areas you’ll have a superb painting.

    Joy

    • #97329 Score: 0

      AlexK
      Participant
      6 pts

      Thanks Joy for you input. I wish it was that easy to apply all good theories in painting. But I am far from it yet.

  • #97324 Score: 0

    K8
    Participant
    14 pts

    Your paintings are always bold and dramatic, Alex, and I love to see what you have been working on. You have a wonderful style and flair for these landscapes and I think you have achieved great atmosphere. I don’t know which painting you did it first but it seems as though you saw what you didn’t like in one and swung the pendulum is a bit too far the opposite way in the next painting. I only say that because the first painting has wonderful browns in the right slope but the intensity of the black, monochromatic value for the crevices and crannies over the brown wash seems harsh. The second painting has softer tones for the crevices but the faces, cracks and caves get lost amongst the busy brushwork. I like the brown wet on wet washes of the right wall in the first painting and think that if you softened and varied some of the too dark tones of the fissures it would have a better read. I like the way you handled the butte on the left in your second painting as you can still see variations in it although it is in shadow. Many times I’ve seen you use a purple-ish hue for your shadows in these landscapes and I think it really enhances the overall atmosphere.  Can I ask what colors you used for your crevices on the first painting  and shadow of the second painting? They both look as though they are Payne’s gray and for me that is always a flat, lifeless color lacking the energy or intensity of a dark when it is mixed.

    Sorry if this is long-winded or confusing… I really admire your work and I am not best communicator!

    Cheers

     

     

    • #97330 Score: 0

      AlexK
      Participant
      6 pts

      I can’t tell you for certain what is in brown mix. But there’s Mars brown as vase wash ( it’s very similar hue to burnt umber but more yellow) then there’s red ocher green hue is real viridian pigment. And paler part I’m pretty sure is raw sienna. I’m big fan of earth pigments. My Russian paints “Leningrad”  24 color set had wide range of earth pigments and I’m just so accustomed to them can’t get rid of any.

      I don’t use Payne’s gray but my black is burnt umber and ultramarine.

  • #97328 Score: 0

    DavidG14
    Participant
    14 pts

    I agree with Joy’s advice and think these are pretty good. I prefer the first and would try to add some more dark cracks if you want to make it more realistic as opposed to impressionist.

    skies are lighter at the bottom. You could also  use some light red or yellow at the bottom to brighten the horizon even if its not in the photo.

     

    • #97331 Score: 0

      AlexK
      Participant
      6 pts

      Thanks David. The thing with cracks I paint a few and try to soften them right away and make mess. Then trying fix and ruin it. So my goal is to do wet in wet and don’t paint cracks at all. But not achieved it yet.

  • #97346 Score: 0

    DavidG14
    Participant
    14 pts

    We need Patrick.  He has a natural ability to mix the hard and soft edges that you are trying to do.  I don’t remember any specific videos he did on this but take a look through his videos and you’ll find examples.

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