Your Watercolour Paintings Domino#11: Dunnottar Castle

This topic contains 13 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  Domino Marama 2 months, 4 weeks ago.

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  • #96467 Score: 0

    Domino Marama
    Participant
    5 pts

    I ended up scanning my first painting to post in another thread, and I realised it’s the only one where my only goal was to finish the painting as best I could. The other nine I was trying out different techniques and ideas. So I think every 10th picture I’m going to put aside learning and just paint and see where I’m at. So for #11 it seemed an ideal point to do one of the pictures Patrick has and I picked Dunnottar Castle.

    Used Cotman colours: Cadmium Red Dark, Alizarin Crimson, Cadmium Yellow, Lemon Yellow, Yellow Ochre, Ultramarine, Cerulean Blue, Emerald, Hookers Green Dark, Sap Green and Raw Umber.

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  • #96476 Score: 0

    Lora
    Participant
    2 pts

    I think your plan sounds like a good one! I’m too much a beginner to give a real critique, but I would say this was pretty good considering you’ve not done many paintings previous. Your clouds and sky are excellent and you done the castle buildings really well. 😀

    • #96486 Score: 0

      Domino Marama
      Participant
      5 pts

      Thanks. I agree the top half of this is the best half 🙂

      I’m finding buildings are the easiest thing for me to paint, I’m guessing it’s because my 3D knowledge is easier to apply with well known shapes. Clouds are the thing I’ve painted most of, my first 5 paintings are all 2/3rds sky as I figured that would be the easiest thing to learn first and be more forgiving of mistakes.

  • #96485 Score: 0

    I’ve also been working on this and made two attempts at the whole picture before deciding to concentrate on how to get the cliff to my satisfaction. I realise that I was seduced by the lovely colours and shapes in Patrick’s painting (how does he make shapeless marks look other than shapeless marks?). Now I have realised that I need to look at the cliff as a pattern of light and shade rather than trying to paint the crags and gulleys as such. It’s a geat picture to practice loosening up, i carry on!

    Patricia Claire

  • #96495 Score: 0

    Patrick
    Keymaster
    30 pts

    Nice painting Domino. You have opted for a different approach to the painting and made it totally your own which is good to see.  Looks to me your painting on a rough paper or possibly a not surface paper. I painted mine on hot pressed which is essentially smooth. This allowed me to create the softer lines. You put a lot of work into this painting it’s a success. Possibly a few darker shadows in the foreground. Thanks for taking it on.

    Patrick

    • #96509 Score: 0

      Domino Marama
      Participant
      5 pts

      Thanks Patrick. I think it’s Bockingford 300gsm NOT paper.

      I think I accidentally deleted my longer reply so if anyone has a copy in a notification or anything, feel free to repost it for me 🙁

  • #96514 Score: 0

    I like your picture, Domino, the clouds and sea work really well and your cliffs look forbidding – I wouldn’t want to climb them!

    It was trickier to paint this motif than I had anticipated, especially getting the light and shadow contrasts and the perspective. I painted my picture on Hahnemuhle 300g rough paper because I wasn’t confident my effort this morning was going to work out too well. I prefer to use Saunders Waterford, but the Hahnemuhle is cheaper. As it is, I’m reasonably happy with the result, although I think it is maybe a bit too fussy; it looks better at a distance of 2 meters.

    The grasses in the foreground were a quick, last minute attempt to increase the sense of distance. I should have thought before putting brush to paper – I ended up with the grasses pointing up towards the hummock, which in turn leads the eye to the castle – all in a straight line slap bang in the middle of the picture, damn!

    I used cerulean for the sky, cobalt and ultra marine plus lemon and Indian yellow for the greens and UM + burnt sienna for the greys. I also used mixes with raw umber for the browns. Oh, also ochre in the sky and elsewhere. The bold shadows I painted with a mix of UM + magenta which I mixed again with the greens, browns and greys for the shadows on the vegetation and rocks.

     

     

    Patricia Claire

    • #96521 Score: 0

      Domino Marama
      Participant
      5 pts

      Thanks Patricia. I’d wait for @Patrick for help on the rotated image, he might move it into a new thread too.

  • #96516 Score: 0

     

    Patricia Claire

  • #96518 Score: 0

    Why does the attachment get posted sideways?

     

    Patricia Claire

  • #96525 Score: 0

    brynteg
    Participant
    1 pt

    I really admire your determination, 10 attempts at a painting really shows a serious intent! I like your style of painting with lots of brush strokes, it is almost impressionist and the painting really gives the feeling of the undulating landscape. Well done for getting there and producing a lovely picture.

    • #96529 Score: 0

      Domino Marama
      Participant
      5 pts

      Thanks brynteg, but this is my only attempt at this painting. #11 actually refers to it being my 11th painting in total. Sorry for any confusion. When isolated from my other posts, I can see how this one could be misleading.

      Oddly enough I watched a video last night where the artist talked about how many times he’d painted the same building and the effect knowing the subject so well had on the process. So I was thinking about what it would be like to paint the same thing repeatedly, but I’ve not actually done it.

       

  • #96577 Score: 0

    JudyR
    Participant
    41 pts

    Very nice, Domino. Your buildings are well drawn, and I love the brickwork detail. I think mixing broad strokes with the smaller dabs would lend itself to more transparency and a softer look. It would also add more depth to the high and low mountains. I see you use hooker’s green, and I did too when I started painting as it seemed to be a staple in every painting kit. I’ve long ago discarded it as to me it’s a harsh unnatural pigment. So many lovely greens can be mixed with the blues and yellows in your palette. But to each their own. 🙂 All in all a lovely painting.

    • #96579 Score: 0

      Domino Marama
      Participant
      5 pts

      Thanks for the useful feedback Judy. I don’t think I used hooker’s green until almost the end. I was building up the texture in the foreground when it started getting a little washed out. That was partly intentional as I was thinking the foreground should be soft focus, but it wasn’t working, I didn’t want to risk more layers, so I grabbed the hooker’s green as a quick way to get some darks in and break up the softness. I didn’t think too much and used it in a few other places then to add some final darks. It does stand out a bit now you mention it 🙂

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